natashapsychology

MINDFULNESS

Practicing mindfulness is one of the single most powerful things you can do for your wellbeing. Want to give it a try? Visit http://www.happify.com for guided meditations and other mindfulness-building activities designed by experts.

Why Mindfulness Is a Superpower: An Animation.

 

IS MINDFULNESS SAFE?

Oxford Mindfulness Centre

For an article discussing the benefits and risks of mindfulness practice.

http://www.oxfordmindfulness.org/is-mindfulness-safe/

DR. RICHARD CHAMBERS: At its essence, mindfulness is being in the moment. It's really about being engaged with what we're doing in each moment, rather than being in that distracted mode where we're daydreaming about the past or the future, or caught up in reactivity.

 

And if you think about it, there are probably moments throughout the day, actually, that you're already mindful and present. If you think about your hobbies, things that you enjoy doing, there's a pretty good chance that when you're doing them, you're engaged in the senses, fully immersed in that activity. And when you're doing these things, you're happy and relaxed, because of course, that's why we set these things out to be our hobbies, because there's something about being present and engaged that's actually very enjoyable.

 

It also increases our performance as we learn to really focus and be present, to listen more effectively, to study more effectively, work more effectively, which is of course why this is being used in health care generally, and more in education.

 

And so mindfulness is an everyday experience of being engaged and present with whatever we're doing from moment to moment. And of course, that's relatively easy to experience when we're doing things we enjoy. But for most of us, it's little harder when we're under the pump at work, stressed, when we're facing exams, when we're sitting in peak hour traffic. For most people, these would be times that we would tend to wander off into the default mode of worrying, or dwelling, or caught up in judgments and reactions, or just daydreaming and not paying attention.

 

So in moments like this, mindfulness becomes a practise. And it is something that we can practise. And of course, anything we practise we get better at. And the practise of mindfulness is very simply to intentionally engage with whatever we're doing in the

present moment, to notice when our mind invariably wanders off somewhere else, and then just to bring it back, and just to practise recognising that we wandered and coming back over and over and over again.

 

And as we do that, we actually, of course, get better at recognising, faster at coming back. We start to rewire the brain. And it becomes a much easier thing to do throughout the day, whenever we need it. There are also a number of cognitive practises as well, such as acceptance, letting go, learning to focus on the present, these kinds of things.

What is Mindfulness and why does it matter?

By DR. RICHARD CHAMBERS from FutureLearn, MONASH University 

Kids explain mindfulness

Jon Kabat-Zinn Defines Mindfulness

Clinical mindfulness expert Jon Kabat-Zinn gives an operational definition of mindfulness.

 

An excerpt from "Becoming Conscious: The Science of Mindfulness" featuring Steve Paulson, Richard Davidson, Jon Kabat-Zinn & Amishi Jha.

 

The New York Academy of Sciences

Default mode and reduced performance

Download a video            or by clicking on the image to the right to Watch DR. CRAIG HASSED and DR. RICHARD CHAMBERS from MONASH Univeristy discuss the concept of default mode and how it contributes to reduced wellbeing and performance.

Craig & Chambers discusing 1
here

Can Mindfulness Increase Our Resilience to Stress?

Neuroscientist Richard Davidson and clinical mindfulness expert Jon Kabat-Zinn on how mindfulness training can lead to greater resilience to stress.

 

An excerpt from "Becoming Conscious: The Science of Mindfulness" featuring Steve Paulson, Richard Davidson, Jon Kabat-Zinn & Amishi Jha.

 

The New York Academy of Sciences

EFFECTS OF MINDFULNESS ON PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH: A REVIEW OF EMPIRICAL STUDIES by Shian-Ling Keng, Moria J. Smoski, and Clive J. Robinsa,

Abstract

Within the past few decades, there has been a surge of interest in the investigation of mindfulness as a psychological construct and as a form of clinical intervention. This article reviews the empirical literature on the effects of mindfulness on psychological health. We begin with a discussion of the construct of mindfulness, differences between Buddhist and Western psychological conceptualizations of mindfulness, and how mindfulness has been integrated into Western medicine and psychology, before reviewing three areas of empirical research: cross-sectional, correlational research on the associations between mindfulness and various indicators of psychological health; intervention research on the effects of mindfulness-oriented interventions on psychological health; and laboratory-based, experimental research on the immediate effects of mindfulness inductions on emotional and behavioral functioning. We conclude that mindfulness brings about various positive psychological effects, including increased subjective well-being, reduced psychological symptoms and emotional reactivity, and improved behavioral regulation. The review ends with a discussion on mechanisms of change of mindfulness interventions and suggested directions for future research.

 

Mindfulness is the miracle by which we master and restore ourselves. Consider, for example: a magician who cuts his body into many parts and places each part in a different region—hands in the south, arms in the east, legs in the north, and then by some miraculous power lets forth a cry which reassembles whole every part of his body. Mindfulness is like that—it is the miracle which can call back in a flash our dispersed mind and restore it to wholeness so that we can live each minute of life.

 

Hanh (1976, p. 14)

 

See full article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3679190/

Other useful information:

 

1. CULTIVATING MULTIPLE ASPECTS OF ATTENTION THROUGH MINDFULNESS MEDITATION ACCOUNTS FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING THROUGH DECREASED RUMINATION

A review paper on the impact of mindfulness on psychological wellbeing and the possible mechanisms explaining those effects.

 See here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4492627/pdf/prbm-8-171.pdf

 

2. THE POTENTIAL FOR MINDFULNESS-BASED INTERVENTION IN WORKPLACE MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION: RESULTS OF A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

A workplace-based randomised controlled trial on the beneficial impact of mindfulness on psychological distress, prolonged fatigue, and perceived stress.

See here: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/asset?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0138089.PDF

 

3. NEURAL MECHANISMS OF MINDFULNESS AND MEDITATION: EVIDENCE FROM NEUROIMAGING STUDIES

Reviews of recent neuroimaging studies that enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms of mindfulness.

See here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4109098/

 

4. THE NEUROSCIENCE OF MINDFULNESS MEDITATION

Paper discussing the impact of mindfulness on the brain. See abstract here: http://www.nature.com/nrn/journal/v16/n4/pdf/nrn3916.pdf

MINDFULNESS MEDITATION - THE BODY SCAN AUDIO

from FurtureLearn Monash Univeristy

The Smiling Mind App

Check out the Smiling Mind App at http://smilingmind.com.au/

or the Apple APP Store or Google Play