natashapsychology

The mental health benefits of employment: Results of a systematic meta-review

By natashapsychology, Apr 12 2016 12:49AM

Matthew Modini

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sadhbh Joyce

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Arnstein Mykletun

Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway; Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø; Norway, and; School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Helen Christensen

Black Dog Institute, Randwick, NSW, Australia

Richard A Bryant

School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Philip B Mitchell

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, and; Black Dog Institute, Randwick, NSW, Australia

Samuel B Harvey⇑

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, and; Black Dog Institute, Randwick, NSW, and; St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW, Australia

Samuel Harvey, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Black Dog Institute Building, Hospital Rd, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia. Email: s.harvey@unsw.edu.au


Abstract


Objective: The literature on mental health in the workplace largely focuses on the negative impacts of work and how work may contribute to the development of mental disorders. The potential mental health benefits of employment have received less attention.

Method: A systematic search of reviews or meta-analyses that consider the benefits of work in regards to mental health was undertaken using academic databases. All relevant reviews were subjected to a quality appraisal.

Results: Eleven reviews were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria, with four deemed to be of at least moderate quality. The available evidence supports the proposition that work can be beneficial for an employee’s well-being, particularly if good-quality supervision is present and there are favourable workplace conditions. The benefits of work are most apparent when compared with the well-documented detrimental mental health effects of unemployment.

Conclusions: The potential positive effects of good work and the role work can play in facilitating recovery from an illness and enhancing mental well-being need to be highlighted and promoted more widely. Future research should aim to further investigate what constitutes a ‘good’ workplace or a ‘good’ job in terms of mental health outcomes.


http://apy.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/01/14/1039856215618523.abstract



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